ASIM

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Climate and giant lightning discharges to be studied from the International Space Station

ASIM is a number of specially designed cameras for the International Space Station that will observe the earth's atmosphere. ASIM will give new insights into climate processes that can help improve climate models.

The atmosphere seen from the International Space Station
The atmosphere seen from the International Space Station
Red sprites over France. Red sprites are giant lightning discharges in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The small filaments at the bottom are lightning channels that are about 100 meter in diameter. The large channels at the top are about 1 kilometer in diameter. This Red Sprite reaches from 30 to 80 km altitude.
Red sprites over France. Red sprites are giant lightning discharges in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The small filaments at the bottom are lightning channels that are about 100 meter in diameter. The large channels at the top are about 1 kilometer in diameter. This Red Sprite reaches from 30 to 80 km altitude.

The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) will study the earth's atmosphere as one system, from the surface of the earth to the edge of space. The atmosphere - the thin layer that covers the planet and protects life on our journey through space.

ASIM will observe extreme thunderstorms, water vapor, clouds, aerosols and their interplay in the atmosphere.

The mission is realized through the European Space Agency (ESA). The National Space Institute - Danish Technical University provides the scientific leadership and the Danish company Terma the technical leadership. Other major partners include the University of Valencia, Spain, and the University of Bergen, Norway, who partake in the development of the instruments.

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